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The Simpsons: Hit & Run Fans Plead for Official Remake

The Simpsons: Hit & Run, a beloved game released 20 years ago, has recently reached a milestone anniversary. Fans of the game are now calling for an official remake or re-release. In a tweet by the PlayStation UK account, a clip of the game's menu screen was shared to commemorate its two decades of existence.

Many fans responded to the tweet with pleas for a remake of the iconic PlayStation title. Some even requested that the game be made playable on the newer PS4 or PS5 consoles. Despite the game's enduring popularity, no attempts have been made to bring it into the modern gaming era.

While there have been fan-made remakes of The Simpsons: Hit & Run, such as one created using Unreal Engine 5, these projects have not been released for public consumption. The legal complexities of creating a game based on The Simpsons, which is now owned by Disney after their acquisition of Fox in 2019, make it difficult for such projects to see the light of day.

However, even some of the show's main writers and showrunners have expressed their desire to see a revival of Hit & Run. The future of video game adaptations featuring the animated family is uncertain, but perhaps Disney will eventually give in to the demands of fans.

In conclusion, the 20th anniversary of The Simpsons: Hit & Run has sparked renewed interest and calls for an official remake or re-release of the popular game. Despite legal obstacles, it is hoped that one day fans will be able to once again experience the yellow family's parody of the Grand Theft Auto series.

Definitions:

– Remake: Creating a new version of a previously released video game that includes updated graphics, gameplay, and possibly additional content.

– Remaster: Enhancing the graphics and audio of a game without making significant changes to the gameplay or content.

– Re-release: Making a game available for purchase again, often on a newer platform or with added features.

Sources:
– The Gamer article by Andrew Heaton